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White-faced capuchins or 'carablancas' are abundant residents of the wet lowland forests on Costa Rica's Caribbean slope, as well as dryer deciduous forests on the Pacific slope. They are very active and highly arboreal, but they will also forage at all levels of the forest and occasionally come to the ground to feed.  They are omnivores, with their diet consisting of ripe fruit, plants, insects, bird eggs, young birds, baby squirrels and small lizards.    Troops will often consist of 2-20 members, with a single adult male plus females and their young.  They can travel up to 2 miles a day while remaining in a fairly small home range.  These monkeys are a common sighting in Manual Antonio National Park in the Central Pacific coast of Costa Rica.  ..This park is one of the most visited National Parks in the country and as a result there are often encounters between monkeys and tourists.  These monkeys can be aggressive when they are searching for food and defending their territory.  In Manuel Antonio National Park, they have been habituated to people.  In this case, a capuchin was able to steal the lunch of a lounging tourist on the beach.  If you chose to visit this park, please watch your belongings and don't feed the monkeys! ..

White-faced capuchins or 'carablancas' are abundant residents of the wet lowland forests on Costa Rica's Caribbean slope, as well as dryer deciduous forests on the Pacific slope. They are very active and highly arboreal, but they will also forage at all levels of the forest and occasionally come to the ground to feed. They are omnivores, with their diet consisting of ripe fruit, plants, insects, bird eggs, young birds, baby squirrels and small lizards. Troops will often consist of 2-20...
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Keywords:
white-faced capuchin
monkey
carablanca
Costa Rica mammal
rainforest animal
beach almond tree
Manuel Antonio National Park
mischievous
don't feed the monkeys
Central America
carablancas
Caribbean
lowlands
forest
Pacific
omnivores